RussiaChechnya.  Young volunteers to the Chechen military forces pose with weapons in their home village. Heidi Bradner. 1996.

The Chechen Women

threestarbanner:

I think it safe to say that no one knows for sure how the women of Dadi Yurt met their end.

On the morning of September 5, 1819, Russian forces under the command of General Aleksey Petrovich Yermolov laid siege to the little Chechen village.

The mountaineer side, by most estimates, was not much more than a hundred or two, man, woman, and child.  On the Russian side, by any reasonable account, there came thousands.

In Chechyna, they say that all are “Free and equal like wolves.” 

Whether or not this is the case, I cannot say, but it is certainly true that it is a saying.

After an initial encounter from which some of the mountaineers fell, a Russian messenger came.  The people of Dadi Yurt were to surrender, kneel down to the Tsar’s crown.  Kiss his hand.

The reply, however, was a simple “No.” 

“We seek no quarter,” the reply said.

The artillery continued, the shells fell.

The men dropped like men are supposed to in times of war.  They fought and they died.  There one minute; gone the next.

But, in the village of Dadi Yurt some forty-six women were.

They watched the men as they died.  And I imagine that, as they watched, they couldn’t help but feel their own mortality striking hammers across their breasts, beating heavily, bursting open their chests.

Some say that, upon their husbands’ deaths, they slit their throats with their men’s daggers, which every Chechen man is known to carry.

Some say that, seeing defeat, they threw themselves onto Russian bayonets and knifes.

Some say that, in fits of despair, they soared like harried eagles from the high stone walls into burning buildings below, their long white dresses afire, turning them into some sort of strange dragons clawing furiously within a pit of nothingness.

Some say that the husbands themselves slayed their wives and children, rather than let them be raped and butchered by the unscrupulous invader, who, even upon sending one into death, still couldn’t quite get it right, who couldn’t quite master the slice.

And even yet, some say that they were taken captive but, minds full of dread and hearts loathe with hate, jumped to their demise, clinging like death to their Russian captors as they, Chechen, Russian, and all, descended the gorge that runs like a lion into the River Terek.

However they went, the fact remains that they went.

I’m not sure what way I prefer they had went, the Chechen women, though I am decidedly stuck between the River Terek and the slitting of throats.  Why, I do not know for sure, but, if one is going to die, it might as well be on her own terms.

Even today, Chechen men may only cry once in their lives and this at their mother’s death. 

But I wonder how many hid, somewhere in the shadows, somewhere behind the public cobblestone walls of towns all across that brief republic, on the day they heard the fate of those maidens, wives, and widows of Dadi Yurt…

And wept as they said a silent prayer for the Chechen women.

(via thechechenka)

Russia, Chechnya.  Chechen child soldier.  Heidi Bradner.

thisiscaucasian:

A Chechen woman dances with a rebel fighter in the centre of Grozny September 6 [1996], celebrating the fifth anniversary of the declaration of Chechen independence and what they hope is the end of the bitter 20-month war with Russia. Chechen separatist leader Zelimkhan Yandarbiyev said Friday that President Boris Yeltsin’s health was a problem for Russia but not for Chechnya which he considers an independent state.

The First Chechen War, the culmination of escalating tensions between the Soviet Union and the independence-minded people of the Chechen-Ingush Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (who, upon their official split from the USSR in 1993, renamed their de facto independent state the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria), came to a deafening conclusion at the Battle of Grozny. Although theirs was the winning side, between 50,000 and 100,000 Chechen civilians and 17,000 Chechen soldiers are estimated to have perished in the conflict—this in comparison to the 161 Russian civilians and nearly 6,000 Russian soldiers who lost their lives.

weecefwew:

RUSSIA. Grozny, Chechnya. 14/02/2002. 
Relative showing the picture of a Chechen unemployed civilian who disappeared several weeks ago. He crossed the street to see a neighbour shortly after night fell, was shot and picked up by unidentified Russian soldiers. Pro-Russian and Russian authorities deny any knowledge of the incident.

Thomas Dworzak

(via dokimasia)

weecefwew:

RUSSIA. Grozny, Chechnya. 19/02/2002. One of the few remaining ethnic Russians in the Chechen capital. The 87 year old blind woman lives with her daughter and receives no government aid. Her grand son was killed when Russian forces fired upon their neighbourhood with artillery late last year. She says that she feels permanently threatened by the Russian soldiers, “as they consider us as Chechens”.

Thomas Dworzak

Some 340 million rubles to be spent on reconstruction of multi-storey housing in Chechnya

The fund for assistance in reforming the housing and utilities service will grant 232.67 million rubles and the Chechen government will grant 105.74 million rubles for reconstruction of 4 multi-storey houses in the Urus-Martanovsky District of Chechnya.

Living conditions of 239 people will be improved. In addition, 441 people in Grozny will move from old houses to new ones.

Chechnya spent about 396 million rubles for the same purpose in 2013.

Ramzan Kadyrov coins to be minted in Zlatoust

The Oruzheynik and Art-Grani factories in Zlatoust will mint gold and 25 silver coins for Chechen Leader Ramzan Kadyrov for Grozny Day on October 5. Each golden coin will weigh 1000 grams. They will be 14mm thick and have a diameter of 120mm.

One side will depict the portrait of Kadyrov, the other side will depict the Heart of Chechnya Mosque named after Akhmat-Haji Kadyrov, said Vladimir Vasyukhin, the director of Oruzheynik. The very first minted coin will belong to Kadyrov himself.

Oruzheynik released coins for Russian President Vladimir Putin on the annexation of Crimea. The coins depict Putin on one side the Crimea on the other.

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

tsoy-pede, a necropolis in southern chechnya, is surrounded by towers watching over the crypts containing the dead. petroglyphs reflect the pre-islamic beliefs of the vainakh people.
poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

tsoy-pede, a necropolis in southern chechnya, is surrounded by towers watching over the crypts containing the dead. petroglyphs reflect the pre-islamic beliefs of the vainakh people.
poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

tsoy-pede, a necropolis in southern chechnya, is surrounded by towers watching over the crypts containing the dead. petroglyphs reflect the pre-islamic beliefs of the vainakh people.
poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

tsoy-pede, a necropolis in southern chechnya, is surrounded by towers watching over the crypts containing the dead. petroglyphs reflect the pre-islamic beliefs of the vainakh people.
poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

tsoy-pede, a necropolis in southern chechnya, is surrounded by towers watching over the crypts containing the dead. petroglyphs reflect the pre-islamic beliefs of the vainakh people.
poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

tsoy-pede, a necropolis in southern chechnya, is surrounded by towers watching over the crypts containing the dead. petroglyphs reflect the pre-islamic beliefs of the vainakh people.
poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

tsoy-pede, a necropolis in southern chechnya, is surrounded by towers watching over the crypts containing the dead. petroglyphs reflect the pre-islamic beliefs of the vainakh people.

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

tsoy-pede, a necropolis in southern chechnya, is surrounded by towers watching over the crypts containing the dead. petroglyphs reflect the pre-islamic beliefs of the vainakh people.

Chechnya composes program for agricultural development

Chechnya has composed a program to improve the financial sustainability of the agricultural industry and development of agricultural lands in 2014-2020. Small farms will be stimulated by the federal budget.

Chechen Agriculture Minister Musa Dadayev said that 3,000 hectares of land were provided for growing grapes. The land devored to viticulture will have expanded to 6,000 hectares by 2020. Chechnya is realizing programs called Gardens of Chechnya, Sustainable Village Development, Startup Farmer and others to boost agricultural output, profit and wages.

Over 2 thousand Chechen pilgrims to visit Saudi Arabia

Some 2.6 thousand Chechen pilgrims are about to visit Saudi Arabia this year in order to see Muslim holy places, Chechen presidential aide Adam Dzhovtakhanov says. The Muslim Spiritual Governance is expected to hold public lectures and press conferences for future pilgrims.

Russian Railways to increase security in Chechnya

The Russian Railways company is going to increase security measures in Chechnya. The company is going to provide security cameras for all facilities located in the republic. The corresponding agreement has been reached by the company’s administration and the local authorities.